Victims say ‘Clare’s law’ should have been enforced sooner

safe to buy Zanaflex online Internet order Tamoxifen Victims say ‘Clare’s law’ should have been enforced sooner in Staffordshire to tackle domestic abuse

https://www.rockrx.org/how-do-you-get-viagra.php From March 8 concerned partners in Staffordshire have been able to find out if their partner has a history of domestic violence but victims have said it should have come to the county sooner.

medication online viagra The law which is also known as the Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme was piloted in Nottinghamshire, Greater Manchester, Wiltshire and Gwent since September 2012.

viagra 150 mg prices Clare’s law is named after 36-year-old Clare Wood who was killed by her ex-boyfriend in her Salford home in 2009, she was unaware that he had been violent to women.

After her death her family campaigned for a change in the law to support actual and potential victims of domestic violence.

Carol Clewes from Blurton who was a victim of domestic violence for 22 years said: “It shouldn’t take the death of a girl and years of campaigning for this law to be passed, there are so many women and men who have been killed so it should have come to Staffordshire sooner.”

The 45-year-old added: “Due to my own suffering I would check anyone out even my children’s partners; it haunts me so much, although I am remarried and have a lovely husband I will never trust another man again and will never get rid of my fears.”

Mother of two Becky Charlton from Meir was also a victim of domestic violence, she said that the scheme could give more victims the courage to leave.

The 23-year-old said: “It’s hard when you are in a violent relationship, it doesn’t always sink in but to be able to have the information confirmed about a partner or potential partners history would give more people the push to get out.”

Becky, who was a victim for three years added: “It’s about time something was done to fight this terrible problem, hopefully it will prevent potential victims from ending up in a dangerous relationship.”

Becky’s Grandmother Maureen White, 68 from Dresden said: “If this law had come to Staffordshire before it could have really helped my granddaughter it’s just a shame it took so long.”

Nationally up to one in four women and one in six men are affected by domestic violence during their lifetime and in the UK 76 women lost their lives at the hands of a violent partner or ex-partner last year.

In Staffordshire 30% of all assaults with injury, excluding serious assaults are as a result of Domestic Incidents

Javid Oomer of Staffordshire Police said: “Although Clare’s law was a pilot in four forces we could not roll it out until the pilot was complete and the findings reported back to the Home Office, the Home Office then made the decision to roll it out to all forces.”

Potential and actual victims, third parties and agencies can all make requests under the scheme, the police then make a proactive decision to disclose details when they receive information to suggest a person could be at risk.

Chief Constable Mike Cunningham of Staffordshire Police said: “We take every reported incident of domestic abuse extremely seriously. We are determined to ensure that victims are supported and that offenders face the consequences of their actions.”

He added: “This initiative can help people who are concerned about this type of crime to feel reassured that they don’t have to suffer and help is available, we know that domestic abuse is significantly under-reported and so we want to encourage victims to have the confidence to come forward and report it so we can help.”

Staffordshire County Council who are carrying out reviews of six deaths by six incidents of domestic violence, found that alcohol abuse and mental health are an issue, there were communication problems between agencies.

The reviews also highlighted domestic violence between older people and recognised parental abuse by children.

Concerned partners can make an application by contacting Staffordshire Police by dialling 101, speaking to a police officer or PCSO on the street or visiting a Police station.

Article by Rosalie Watts

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